Paradise Landscape and Hardscape is an expert landscaping company in Annapolis, Maryland that provides professional services to help customers maintain a beautiful, healthy trees, shrubs and plants. Our Team looks for insects, disease and problem areas to create a unique landscaping plan for your yard. We provide tree planting, tree removal, shrub pruning, tree transplanting, and plant installation and trimming services to ensure the growth and long-term healthy of your landscape. Call us today at (443) 808-0885 for a free estimate!

It is often a tough task to keep your greenery going during these cold winter months. Thankfully there are a number of plants and trees that can be kept from the snow, ice and barren ground.

Perfect Outdoor Plants for Winter Landscaping in Annapolis

For gardeners, yard enthusiasts and homeowners in the Annapolis, Maryland area, winter doesn’t have to mean sterile white, dead gardens. There are many plants you can add to your winter landscape that bloom in winter – even in our area!

Now is a wonderful time to go through your garden and consider ways to add color and texture to your winter landscape. Here are some perfect outdoor plants for winter landscaping in the Annapolis, Maryland area. Contact us for a free estimate for all of your landscaping needs!

Outdoor Plants for Winter Landscape Color

Don’t despair! In the winter, you don’t have to give up the lovely hues in your garden or backyard. For starters, here’s a list of plants from HGTV for your winter landscape and gardens that also are rated for the Annapolis, Maryland hardiness zones:

Mahonia: Leatherleaf mahonia (Mahonia bealei) and selected cultivars of M. x mediaprovide a yellow bloom and berries that birds enjoy in winter. Mahonia, sometimes known as Beale’s barberry, is a bristly shrub that has become more invasive in warmer environments. The shrubs grow to 8-12 feet but can easily be maintained at a 6-foot height.

Best location is in a security perimeter or at least away from sidewalks and walking paths. A close relative, Oregon grape holly, flowers in early spring and more hardy to USDA (4)5.

Daphne Bholua: The most common variety of this species introduced to the West from Nepal is ‘Jacqueline Postill.’ It has fragrant, white blooms that appear in the middle of winter. It is also evergreen and covered with beautiful thin, wavy, deep green leaves.

Lily-of-the-Valley Bush: Pieris japonica is also a type of evergreen shrub that prefers moist, well-drained, acid, organic soil. They have been around since at least 1000 B.C., and are one of the most fragrant blooming plants. The stems are covered with tiny, drooping bell-shaped flower clusters of delicate white blossoms that burst from pink buds in winter and spring. Their leaves are medium-bright green and lance shaped.

Plant this one in the late fall so the cool winter temperatures allow a proper dormancy period.

Christmas Rose: Helleborus niger is one of the easier garden plants to grow. They are considered the aristocrats of the winter and early spring garden. Beautiful nodding saucer-shape flowers grace the stems when few plants brave the cold winter elements. The flowers consist of 5 showy petallike sepals surrounded by leafy bracts. These tough plants thrive in shade or dappled sunshine and moist, organic soil; there are hundreds of cultivars available in a variety of hues, including white and cream to pink, rose, burgundy, and light green.

Hellebore require a good, deep, well-drained soil with plenty of humus and partial shade. When temperatures fall below 15 degrees Fahrenheit, blooming is usually put off until the weather warms. At low temperatures, some protection is needed.

Plant these under under deciduous trees as they enjoy the summer shade and winter sun.

Winter Jasmine: Jasminium nudiflorum is a beautiful vining shrub that can be trained up a trellis or wall. However, it is more appealing as mass as ground cover for slopes, banks and terraces. It’s easy to trail stems over a stone wall or terrace. As mentioned above, it can easily be trained as a vine on a support structure. In fact, as a vine, it is quite effective when framed close up in front of a wall.

In the winter, the beauty has hundreds of bright yellow flowers that open along the stems in the dead of our coldest months.

This one will have you watching out for Japanese beetles.

Witch Hazel: The American witch hazel tree is named this because they were used as dowsing rods by early colonists in the New World who could not obtain English hazel wood for that purpose. All species contain high tannin content and have been a part of the cosmetic industry as an old fashioned astringent known as witch hazel.

Rich coppery-orange flowers on this unusual shrub add blazing color to the winter landscape. Flowers with wavy, strap-like petals appear on the bare branches. Plant near entries and patios. The ‘Jelena’ variety blooms in a coppery orange shade as early as January, and it has a crimson-orange fall foliage.

The ‘Jelena’ like full sun and regular weekly watering.

Red River Lily: Also known as Kaffir lily, is native to South Africa and normally blooms beautiful bright red blooms in the summer. But since it wasn’t able to shift the blooming pattern to fit our climate, it blooms here in the very late, in fall or even later if the weather isn’t too cold in winter.

Ideal to decorate around bodies of water in your garden, it is also perfectly suited to ordinary soil, provided that it is often watered in summer.

The Kaffir lily’s name comes from the fact that this beautiful bloom grows freely in Southern Africa’s formerly known as Kaffraria, the land of the Kaffirs. The autumn landscape is brightened with these gladiolus-like flowers. They bloom on stalks adorned with basic cup to star shaped blooms.

These grow to a height of 16 to 24 inches, like full sun and pretty moist soil. Once properly settled in, schizostylis is a plant that has little need for care. Cut flowers as they wilt to spur appearance of new buds. Thick mulch on the ground helps keep the soil cool and moist which helps avoid many watering sessions.

Other Winter Landscape Suggestions

Of course, flowers aren’t the only plants that can jazz up your winter landscape and garden. Interested in a few more winter landscape ideas? Check these out. They complement the gray days of winter in your garden:

Bark: While your deciduous trees will shed their leaves in the winter, the underlying bark and branches may catch the eye. The dark, reddish-brown bark of flowering dogwood trees has square-shaped plates that provide texture. Birch trees’ pale color contrasts well with the peeling texture.

Evergreens: As the name implies they’re lush, and they certainly live up to it. These conifers and shrubs provide a constant gorgeous green hue to your garden throughout the winter. Their branches also look absolutely gorgeous when draped in snow. There are a ton of varieties to meet your landscape needs.

Ornamental Bay Grasses: Another awesome option is to leave your ornamental grasses in place during the winter. When covered in snow, the greens, tans and oranges provide a lot of neutral color and beauty. They also sound amazing with the whipping winter winds.

Let’s Talk Hardscapes

Consider what you will lose by the winter… parts of your yard will be barren. Are there parts of your yard that won’t be suitable for any of the winter plants you’ve considered? This might be an excellent time to consider something more permanent, such as an arbor, a bench, a trellis, or even a new pavers patio or pavers pool deck.

If you’re planning to build a project in the summer, you’ll be ready to start work in the fall and have the item completed by winter. You won’t want to just throw down some new furniture. In addition to thinking about how you’ll decorate around it, consider how you’ll make paths accessible, what kinds of new plants will fit your new outdoor living space!

This is also a good time to consider upkeep on structures in your garden. In fact, there is no reason why you can’t do this! Maybe your patio furniture is currently teal, and you don’t want it to be so blue in the winter. You could clean or refinish old wooden railings for a more sophisticated appearance. To make an item stand out in the winter gray and white, give it some color.

Light Up Your Garden & Walkways

During the dark evenings of winter, all you need is a few simple ideas to brighten up your home. Solar lighting eliminates the hassle of connecting wires across your yard, so it’s much more environmentally friendly than traditional Christmas decorations. Lighting that penetrates the darkness is another way to liven up your property in late winter.

Get An Expert’s Opinion

If you live in the Annapolis, Maryland area, please contact us to start making plans now to transform a potentially dreary landscape into a magical, winter wonderland. Now is a wonderful time to go through your garden and consider ways to add color and texture to your winter landscape.

We can help you pick out the perfect outdoor plants for winter landscaping in the Annapolis, Maryland area. Whether you’re creating a new gazebo, starting a planting campaign, or simply fine-tuning your already lavish garden, our designers will help you come up with the best option for your house.

As we roll into the fall, we start to ponder tree care in the winter. During the winter, it’s critical to pay attention to your trees and shrubs in Maryland, especially if you live in a rural area. With most woody plants dormant during this time of year, pruning back dying or intrusive branches is more viable. Pruning trees is crucial since well-pruned plants produce greater fruit and flowers. It also helps your plants defend against pesky insects and diseases. Team Paradise is here with helpful advice on why, where, and when you should start pruning your trees.

The tree is a symbol of life – it’s green, full of leaves and provides shade. When winter comes around, the tree sheds its foliage to protect itself from the cold. This makes tree care in the winter different than tree care at other times of year. Let’s discuss these factors in detail so you know if now is a good time to plant a tree in your yard.

Decide On Tree Type – Evergreen or Deciduous

Consider the kind of tree you want to plant before deciding whether to undertake it in the winter. Spruce and pine trees, for example, never shed their needles. Evergreens have a smaller planting window than deciduous trees. This is because they need the nutrients they can absorb before the ground freezes. The key is to plant evergreens when the soil is no lower than 60 degrees.
 
Deciduous trees, which go dormant in the winter and shed their leaves, need less energy to grow in the winter months. This implies that when you seed them, the temperature may be cooler. Plant deciduous trees in the fall or early spring before they begin to bud, when the soil is 50 degrees or higher.

Climate Zone

The climate has a big influence on when you may plant a tree in your yard. Throughout Annapolis and most of northern United States, fall is the best time to plant trees. The heat of summer has passed, but the searing frosts of winter have yet to appear.
 
But, in more southern regions, you have more time to plant trees. These states tend to include In Florida, Louisiana, Alabama, Georgia, and South Carolina.

Upcoming Weather Forecast

Seasonal and short-term weather can all have an impact on your ability to plant a tree, as well as your climate. Even if you live in a northern location, a particularly harsh winter may be ideal for planting trees. Yet, owing to an early September snowstorm, you must wait until later to plant new trees.

Early, Mid, or Late Winter

The winter season is three phases. The early part of the winter season is like fall. This makes it ideal for tree relocation. When the ground freezes or snow falls, though, it’s best to wait until late winter or early spring. New saplings are more vulnerable to frost damage. Their roots can also dry out if planted midwinter.

Special Considerations

Here are some pointers to help your sapling survive the winter. This is good information for any type of tree you want to grow:
 
  • Keep watering: Every few days, water the earth surrounding the young tree until it is frozen. Give it a bigger watering than usual before a major freeze.
  • Mulch: Roots in particular are harmed by the freeze-thaw cycle. Mulch might insulate the surface and maintain a more constant temperature. It also inhibits evaporation, allowing the roots to receive water a little easier.
  • Stake the tree: Windy conditions during the early spring might impede a sapling’s growth. To assist the tree grow straight and true, bind it to three or four supports.
  • Consider applying anti-desiccant: Evergreens that include broadleaf are protected from desiccation (drying out) during the winter with anti-desiccants, which give a waxy covering.

A Few More Tips for Tree Care in The Winter

  • Don’t fertilize: You don’t want a sapling to sprout new limbs right after being planted. Compost and bone meal are both acceptable, but wait until the soil is fertilized in the spring.
  • Don’t prune: Transplanting is tough enough for a sapling without you taking any of its branches away. This occurs if a limb is damaged while being carried and must be cut off.
  • Protect from deer: Deer repellents are one of the most efficient deer deterrents available. To keep your young tree protected from deer browsing, apply a deer repellent to it. Install a protective tube over the trunk to prevent deer rubbing their antlers on it to avoid damage.
Trees and shrubs are susceptible to harsh winters. Cold weather can desiccate leaves, bark, and branches, as well as flower buds and roots.Humans and animals contribute to winter tree maintenance issues in their own way; salt on the road and sidewalk destroyed soil health, and animals generally eat tree bark and twigs as a result of winter food shortages. These threats, especially when combined, can damage your trees and plants if you aren’t prepared!
Thanks to this guide, you should now know whether you can plant a tree this time of year. Feel free to contact our amazing team at Paradise Landscape and Hardscape! We are happy to answer any questions you might have. Spring will be here before you know it, so it’s wise to start planning. Contact us by clicking the button below to request a FREE JOB ESTIMATE today!
REQUEST FREE ESTIMATE

Incorporating various plants into your landscape is a great way to add both interest, appeal, and functional use. But if the plants require a lot of attention, they can quickly become more of a hassle than a joy. Chances are, you’re a busy person and you don’t have time to be cutting back, trimming, fertilizing, or managing pests and diseases on a bunch of high-maintenance plants.

That’s why you might be looking for a list of low maintenance plants to add to your landscape.

If that’s the case, we’ve got you covered. In fact, we’ve rounded up 12 different low maintenance plants (in the trees, shrubs, and flowers categories) to help get you started.

Of course, it’s important to keep in mind that the proper installation of these plants is key. That’s because you can easily turn a low maintenance plant into a high maintenance one if you install it incorrectly (such as putting a shade-loving plant in the full sun). We have often found that many homeowners who say they have a “high maintenance landscape” actually just have plants which are installed improperly.

Likewise, all plants, even ones we’ve selected require some degree of care. But if your landscape designer chooses wisely, that amount of maintenance can be drastically reduced.

Understanding those key points, let’s take a look at some of our top picks.

Low Maintenance Trees

While the definition of what makes a tree “low maintenance” may differ a bit, we’re considering trees that are relatively disease and pest-resistant and those that don’t need lots of care, such as regular pruning, to fall under the category of low maintenance trees. While there is no such thing as a tree that needs zero care, these 4 won’t give you lots of extra work:

  1. Japanese Maple: Japanese Maple trees are famous for their bright fall foliage. There are many varieties of Japanese Maples, some of which are airy and upright and others that are compact and domed. Generally speaking, all forms of the Japanese Maple would make a good selection as a low maintenance tree that serves as a small ornamental accent.
  2. Serviceberry: Serviceberry trees are deciduous members of the Rosaceae family. They offer four-season interest with beautiful blooms in the spring, some fruit in the winter, bright fall foliage, and beautiful bark color in the winter. Growing and caring for a Serviceberry tree does not take a lot of work. It is a very cold-hardy tree and will perform well, even in the winter and makes an excellent small ornamental accent.
  3. Crape Myrtle: Perhaps one of the most well-known trees in the Annapolis, MD area, the Crape Myrtle is often referred to as the “lilac of the South.” it has striking flowers and beautiful foliage that makes it a stunning addition to a landscape. It is also relatively low maintenance as far as flowering trees go. It only needs approximately 30 to 60 minutes of pruning each year and it will look and perform well for you. Crape myrtles come in a variety of colors and will grow to vary in size when they mature.
  4. Magnolia: Magnolia trees can be evergreen or deciduous but both types are known for their large and striking blossoms. These trees are known to be hardy and adaptable. Though they prefer slightly acidic soil, they will adapt to your natural soil, even if it’s sandy or heavy in clay. These trees often serve as small ornamental accent plants, but there are some varieties that will eventually grow into medium-sized trees.

Low Maintenance Shrubs

Like trees, when looking at low maintenance shrubs, we’re looking at varieties that don’t require a lot of tending to. These are shrubs that are known to be fairly drought-tolerant and generally resistant to problems with disease or pests. Here are 4 that are easily adaptable to most landscapes:

  1. Burning Bush: This shrub is named for the bright crimson color it turns in the fall. Native to Asia, this large bush will adapt well to almost any site or soil condition and requires minimal care. While it’s almost wholly hands-off, occasional pruning will help keep its size down if you have a tight space. This medium to large-sized shrub has many uses and can even create excellent privacy screens during spring through fall.
  2. Nandina: This hardy and adaptable shrub has been nicknamed “heavenly bamboo” for its ability to thrive almost anywhere and its resemblance to bamboo. Nandina is known for their evergreen nature and their unique color combinations with leaves that change from green to reddish purple. Different cultivars will grow as small or medium-sized shrubs.
  3. Azalea: These members of the Rhododendron family produce showy and fragrant blooms in the spring in colors like white, lavender, orange, gold, red, and purple. They are easy to care for as they require very little attention, as long as they were properly planted and are in moist, but well-drained soil. They are fairly slow growers so these are ideal choices for tighter spots. With regular pruning, it’s easy to keep them confined within most spaces.
  4. Hydrangea: Generally speaking, hydrangeas are versatile and easy to grow. There are many varieties of this flowering shrub, though Oakleaf has been said to be one of the easier to care for as they can tolerate cold weather, handle more sun, and even withstand drought. But all varieties of hydrangea are relatively low maintenance and produce stunning blooms. These shrubs vary in size from 3-8 ft.

Low Maintenance Flowers

Choosing low-maintenance perennials will help add interest and color to your landscape without adding a bunch of extra work. Perennials will re-grow each season vs. annual flowers which only last one growing season and will need to be replanted. Here are 4 that you might want to consider if you’re looking for low-maintenance flowers:

  1. Daylilies: Daylilies establish themselves quickly and are easy to grow. They are incredibly drought-tolerant and therefore require minimal (if any) watering. Color variations include yellow, gold, orange, red, and purple.
  2. Salvia: Salvia is of the largest genus in the Mint family. Perennial Salvias are easy to grow and perform well in our local climate. We particularly like Russian Sage, a low maintenance perennial that produces tall spires of bluish flowers.
  3. Lavender: Lavender is known for its attractive foliage, vibrant flowers, and distinct scent, which is said to have a calming effect. It’s also an un-demanding, tough woody perennial that requires very little care. Lavender only needs well-drained soil and some room to grow and it will thrive.
  4. Coreopsis: More commonly known as “Tickseed,” Coreopsis is appreciated for its bright and showy flowers and its ability to thrive in almost any soil. While there are more than 100 species, almost all of them are low maintenance and drought-tolerant.

 

Knowing which plants to incorporate is one important piece of the puzzle—but it’s not everything. It’s also a matter of incorporating them in a way that makes sense.

As we mentioned, it’s important to ensure that all of your plants are installed in a way that will allow them to thrive. This means thinking about things like access to sunlight, watering needs, and the plant’s location in terms of other plants around it. It can be a lot to figure out.

But there’s even more to it than that. There is also the need for an eye for design in your installation process. Without that, you would risk your finished project looking like a random hodgepodge of plants installed without any real thought or plan.

This is where a talented landscape designer in Annapolis, MD will be invaluable. Just like you could tell someone all of the best colors needed to paint a picture, it won’t make them able to produce a masterpiece. In the same light, ordering a bunch of these plants and having them delivered to your driveway isn’t going to get you that professionally designed landscape you’re after.

It’s also important to note that while we’ve named some of our favorite low maintenance plants, they won’t necessarily work for every property. We have dozens of other great ideas and suggestions if these plants aren’t right for you.

A beautiful, low maintenance landscape can add tremendous value—if it’s designed and installed properly. The truth is, that’s a big “if.” By making the right choice in a landscape design company, you can make sure that you wind up with the truly low-maintenance landscape you were looking to achieve.

If you’re looking for some guidance on adding low maintenance plants to your landscape, request a consultation, get your customized plan, and relax as we give you the royal treatment.

Request An Estimate

In the late ’80s, NASA and the Associated Landscape Contractors of America studied houseplants as a way to purify the air in space facilities. They found several plants that filter out common volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Lucky for us the plants can also help clean indoor air on Earth, which is typically far more polluted than outdoor air.

Projects like installing new carpet and painting walls can release chemicals that pollute indoor air. Luckily, some houseplants moonlight as efficient purifiers. For the best results, put as many plants as you can care for in the rooms you use most, says environmental scientist Dr. Bill Wolverton. That means you’ll want at least two plants (in 10- to 12-inch pots) per 100 square feet of space; if you’re in the middle of major renovations, aim for more plants. One tip: Be sure not to overwater, as too much soil moisture can lead to mold growth.

Here are 10 house plants for clean air that are smart options we can help you with!

English Ivy (Hedera helix)
This hearty, climbing vine thrives in small spaces. It also fares well in rooms with few windows or little sunlight.

How it Helps: Its dense foliage excels at absorbing formaldehyde—the most prevalent indoor pollutant, says Wolverton—which shows up in wood
floorboard resins and synthetic carpet dyes.

Peace Lily (Spathiphyllum)
Among the few air purifiers that flower, the peace lily adapts well to low light but requires weekly watering and is poisonous to pets.

How it Helps: This year-round bloomer rids the air of the VOC benzene, a carcinogen found in paints, furniture wax, and polishes. It also sucks up acetone, which is emitted by electronics, adhesives, and
certain cleaners.

Lady Palm (Rhapis excelsa)
An easy-to-grow, tree-like species, the lady palm may take a while to start shooting upward. But once it does, its fan-like patterned leaves will add charm to any spot.

How it Helps: Easy on the eyes, this plant targets ammonia, an enemy of the respiratory system and a major ingredient in cleaners, textiles, and dyes.

Boston Fern (Nephrolepis exaltata)
First popularized during the Victorian era, the Boston fern features feather-like leaves and curved fronds that are well suited to indoor hanging baskets. It’s considered one of the most efficient air purifiers, but it can prove a bit difficult to maintain because of its need for constant moisture and humidity.

How it Helps: This fern works especially well in removing formaldehyde, which is found in some glues, as well as pressed wood products, including cabinetry, plywood paneling, and furniture. (Some studies also show it can remove toxic metals, such as mercury and arsenic, from soil.)

Snake Plant (Sansevieria trifasciata)
Also known as mother-in-law’s tongue, this sharp-leafed plant thrives in low light. At night it absorbs carbon dioxide and releases oxygen (a reversal of the process most plants undergo). Pot a couple and put them in your bedroom for a slight oxygen boost while you sleep.

How it Helps: In addition to helping lower carbon dioxide, the snake plant rids air of formaldehyde and benzene.

Golden Pothos (Epipremnum aureum)
This fast-growing vine has a reputation for flexibility. You can pot it with something to support it, plant it in a hanging basket, or train it to climb a trellis. Dark green leaves with golden streaks and marbling make it an eye-catching addition to a home or office.

How it Helps: Like many other vines, it tackles formaldehyde, but golden pothos also targets carbon monoxide and benzene. Consider placing one in your mudroom or entryway, where car exhaust fumes heavy in formaldehyde are most likely to sneak indoors from the garage.

Wax Begonia (Begonia semperflorens)
Place in an area with abundant sunlight and this semiwoody succulent will produce pretty clusters of flat white, pink, or red flowers during the summer.

How it Helps: The wax plant is a heavy hitter in filtering out benzene and chemicals produced by toluene, a liquid found in some waxes and adhesives, according to a University of Georgia study conducted last
year.

Red-Edged Dracaena (Dracaena marginata)
While this slow-growing shrub can get quite tall (up to 15 feet), it’s relatively compact and will make the most out of whatever floor space you can offer it. For best results, keep one in a room with high ceilings and moderate sunlight, and water occasionally. Its red-trimmed leaves will deliver a dose of unexpected color.

How it Helps: This plant will take care of gases released by xylene, trichloroethylene, and formaldehyde, which can be introduced by lacquers, varnishes, and sealers.

Spider Plant: (Chlorophytum comosum)
A good option for beginning gardeners, the spider plant reproduces quickly, growing long, grassy leaves as well as hanging stems, which eventually sprout plantlets—hence its arachnid-inspired name.

How it Helps: Put a spider plant on a pedestal or in a hanging basket close to a sunlit window and you’ll benefit from fewer airborne formaldehyde and benzene molecules.

Source: This Old House