Deer can cause a lot of damage to your yard and landscape – especially in the fall. Deer control is one of the most popular and frequently requested services at Paradise Landscaping & Hardscapes right now. We can help reduce the presence of deer in and around the edges of your property. But how do you know that you’ll need our services in the first place? Deer are quite active in the fall. They leave behind traces of damage that may be confused with pest animal damage at times. In any case, it’s better to be safe than sorry! The following are some common signs of deer damage in your yard.

Early Indications of Damage

You use ornamental plants to improve the look of your lawn, garden, and landscaping. Unfortunately, they are a major food source for deer. Because they consume the buds, leaves, and stems, this depletes the plants of what they require to live. Deer are known to hang out in farms, orchards, nurseries, and residential neighborhoods. When the lower branches on trees begin to disappear, there are likely deer in the area. Arborvitae is particularly prone to this type of damage. Twigs and stems will appear to have been aggressively pruned as a result of the damage.

The Problem of Antler Rubbing

Deer engage in a behavior known as antler rubbing, which is a habit. Their antlers are covered in velvet, which is quite unpleasant for them. The rubbing affects the growth of animal antlers, as well as tree trunks and limbs. The velvet is used to assist mature bucks (male deer) in growing larger antlers. The normal breeding season is fall, therefore the velvet begins to shed at this time. This process aids in the polishing of the antlers before they are detached and dropped in midwinter. Deer rubs are small trees’ prominent locations where deer rub their antlers against the bark, removing it from the tree until only hardwood remains. This damage is permanent, and many times will diminish the health of the tree.

Managing Deer on Your Property

Deterring deer with repellents or scare devices is one way to go. Deer control is simpler if the deer can’t link your yard with a convenient eating spot. In the fall, once deer have adjusted to several noises, you may switch between these approaches as needed. Once deer are used to a particular sound, they cease ignoring it. If there was little damage over the summer, you may not have noticed; as winter draws near, it will become more obvious. Temporary fencing, permanent fencing, and tree guards can all help. However, if none of these solutions work, it’s time to call the experts!

Paradise Landscape and Hardscapes in Annapolis, MD

We’ve been in business for decades in our home town of Annapolis. We are a small business independently run and service Anne Arundel County and parts of the Eastern Shore. From trimming and pruning to total lawn care and property maintenance during the growing season, we have the team of Annapolis landscape professionals here for you to put your mind at ease. A few of our lawn care services are:

    • Weekly Lawn Mowing Services
    • Customized Fertilization Programs
    • Aeration
    • Seeding
    • Thatching
    • Sod Installation
    • Complete Lawn Restoration

No matter how large or small the scope of work is, our goal remains the same – to ensure that each customer is happy. Every member of our team consistently provides professionalism, reliable construction, and top-notch quality to exceed your expectations. In fact, you’ll see me (Michael Clautice) on every job site!

My passion for perfection is what keeps our companies’ standards of excellence set so high! I truly love what I do — let Team Paradise to your dirty work.

Are you ready to expand your outdoor living space? Let’s connect this year! We have the education, experience and expertise to bring your space to life in addition to offering a wide variety of other full range of Annapolis landscaping services such as: lawn care and maintenance services, complete yard restoration, lawn clean-up, storm clean-up, plant and tree installation, mulching and weeding, leaf removal, snow removal and hardscape installations such as paver driveways and walkways, lighting, waterfall units, fire pits and more! Are you on social? Come say hi to us here: FACEBOOK and INSTAGRAM

Fill out our short form by clicking the estimate button below and let’s connect!

As we roll into the fall, we start to ponder tree care in the winter. During the winter, it’s critical to pay attention to your trees and shrubs in Maryland, especially if you live in a rural area. With most woody plants dormant during this time of year, pruning back dying or intrusive branches is more viable. Pruning trees is crucial since well-pruned plants produce greater fruit and flowers. It also helps your plants defend against pesky insects and diseases. Team Paradise is here with helpful advice on why, where, and when you should start pruning your trees.

The tree is a symbol of life – it’s green, full of leaves and provides shade. When winter comes around, the tree sheds its foliage to protect itself from the cold. This makes tree care in the winter different than tree care at other times of year. Let’s discuss these factors in detail so you know if now is a good time to plant a tree in your yard.

Decide On Tree Type – Evergreen or Deciduous

Consider the kind of tree you want to plant before deciding whether to undertake it in the winter. Spruce and pine trees, for example, never shed their needles. Evergreens have a smaller planting window than deciduous trees. This is because they need the nutrients they can absorb before the ground freezes. The key is to plant evergreens when the soil is no lower than 60 degrees.
 
Deciduous trees, which go dormant in the winter and shed their leaves, need less energy to grow in the winter months. This implies that when you seed them, the temperature may be cooler. Plant deciduous trees in the fall or early spring before they begin to bud, when the soil is 50 degrees or higher.

Climate Zone

The climate has a big influence on when you may plant a tree in your yard. Throughout Annapolis and most of northern United States, fall is the best time to plant trees. The heat of summer has passed, but the searing frosts of winter have yet to appear.
 
But, in more southern regions, you have more time to plant trees. These states tend to include In Florida, Louisiana, Alabama, Georgia, and South Carolina.

Upcoming Weather Forecast

Seasonal and short-term weather can all have an impact on your ability to plant a tree, as well as your climate. Even if you live in a northern location, a particularly harsh winter may be ideal for planting trees. Yet, owing to an early September snowstorm, you must wait until later to plant new trees.

Early, Mid, or Late Winter

The winter season is three phases. The early part of the winter season is like fall. This makes it ideal for tree relocation. When the ground freezes or snow falls, though, it’s best to wait until late winter or early spring. New saplings are more vulnerable to frost damage. Their roots can also dry out if planted midwinter.

Special Considerations

Here are some pointers to help your sapling survive the winter. This is good information for any type of tree you want to grow:
 
  • Keep watering: Every few days, water the earth surrounding the young tree until it is frozen. Give it a bigger watering than usual before a major freeze.
  • Mulch: Roots in particular are harmed by the freeze-thaw cycle. Mulch might insulate the surface and maintain a more constant temperature. It also inhibits evaporation, allowing the roots to receive water a little easier.
  • Stake the tree: Windy conditions during the early spring might impede a sapling’s growth. To assist the tree grow straight and true, bind it to three or four supports.
  • Consider applying anti-desiccant: Evergreens that include broadleaf are protected from desiccation (drying out) during the winter with anti-desiccants, which give a waxy covering.

A Few More Tips for Tree Care in The Winter

  • Don’t fertilize: You don’t want a sapling to sprout new limbs right after being planted. Compost and bone meal are both acceptable, but wait until the soil is fertilized in the spring.
  • Don’t prune: Transplanting is tough enough for a sapling without you taking any of its branches away. This occurs if a limb is damaged while being carried and must be cut off.
  • Protect from deer: Deer repellents are one of the most efficient deer deterrents available. To keep your young tree protected from deer browsing, apply a deer repellent to it. Install a protective tube over the trunk to prevent deer rubbing their antlers on it to avoid damage.
Trees and shrubs are susceptible to harsh winters. Cold weather can desiccate leaves, bark, and branches, as well as flower buds and roots.Humans and animals contribute to winter tree maintenance issues in their own way; salt on the road and sidewalk destroyed soil health, and animals generally eat tree bark and twigs as a result of winter food shortages. These threats, especially when combined, can damage your trees and plants if you aren’t prepared!
Thanks to this guide, you should now know whether you can plant a tree this time of year. Feel free to contact our amazing team at Paradise Landscape and Hardscape! We are happy to answer any questions you might have. Spring will be here before you know it, so it’s wise to start planning. Contact us by clicking the button below to request a FREE JOB ESTIMATE today!
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In the late ’80s, NASA and the Associated Landscape Contractors of America studied houseplants as a way to purify the air in space facilities. They found several plants that filter out common volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Lucky for us the plants can also help clean indoor air on Earth, which is typically far more polluted than outdoor air.

Projects like installing new carpet and painting walls can release chemicals that pollute indoor air. Luckily, some houseplants moonlight as efficient purifiers. For the best results, put as many plants as you can care for in the rooms you use most, says environmental scientist Dr. Bill Wolverton. That means you’ll want at least two plants (in 10- to 12-inch pots) per 100 square feet of space; if you’re in the middle of major renovations, aim for more plants. One tip: Be sure not to overwater, as too much soil moisture can lead to mold growth.

Here are 10 house plants for clean air that are smart options we can help you with!

English Ivy (Hedera helix)
This hearty, climbing vine thrives in small spaces. It also fares well in rooms with few windows or little sunlight.

How it Helps: Its dense foliage excels at absorbing formaldehyde—the most prevalent indoor pollutant, says Wolverton—which shows up in wood
floorboard resins and synthetic carpet dyes.

Peace Lily (Spathiphyllum)
Among the few air purifiers that flower, the peace lily adapts well to low light but requires weekly watering and is poisonous to pets.

How it Helps: This year-round bloomer rids the air of the VOC benzene, a carcinogen found in paints, furniture wax, and polishes. It also sucks up acetone, which is emitted by electronics, adhesives, and
certain cleaners.

Lady Palm (Rhapis excelsa)
An easy-to-grow, tree-like species, the lady palm may take a while to start shooting upward. But once it does, its fan-like patterned leaves will add charm to any spot.

How it Helps: Easy on the eyes, this plant targets ammonia, an enemy of the respiratory system and a major ingredient in cleaners, textiles, and dyes.

Boston Fern (Nephrolepis exaltata)
First popularized during the Victorian era, the Boston fern features feather-like leaves and curved fronds that are well suited to indoor hanging baskets. It’s considered one of the most efficient air purifiers, but it can prove a bit difficult to maintain because of its need for constant moisture and humidity.

How it Helps: This fern works especially well in removing formaldehyde, which is found in some glues, as well as pressed wood products, including cabinetry, plywood paneling, and furniture. (Some studies also show it can remove toxic metals, such as mercury and arsenic, from soil.)

Snake Plant (Sansevieria trifasciata)
Also known as mother-in-law’s tongue, this sharp-leafed plant thrives in low light. At night it absorbs carbon dioxide and releases oxygen (a reversal of the process most plants undergo). Pot a couple and put them in your bedroom for a slight oxygen boost while you sleep.

How it Helps: In addition to helping lower carbon dioxide, the snake plant rids air of formaldehyde and benzene.

Golden Pothos (Epipremnum aureum)
This fast-growing vine has a reputation for flexibility. You can pot it with something to support it, plant it in a hanging basket, or train it to climb a trellis. Dark green leaves with golden streaks and marbling make it an eye-catching addition to a home or office.

How it Helps: Like many other vines, it tackles formaldehyde, but golden pothos also targets carbon monoxide and benzene. Consider placing one in your mudroom or entryway, where car exhaust fumes heavy in formaldehyde are most likely to sneak indoors from the garage.

Wax Begonia (Begonia semperflorens)
Place in an area with abundant sunlight and this semiwoody succulent will produce pretty clusters of flat white, pink, or red flowers during the summer.

How it Helps: The wax plant is a heavy hitter in filtering out benzene and chemicals produced by toluene, a liquid found in some waxes and adhesives, according to a University of Georgia study conducted last
year.

Red-Edged Dracaena (Dracaena marginata)
While this slow-growing shrub can get quite tall (up to 15 feet), it’s relatively compact and will make the most out of whatever floor space you can offer it. For best results, keep one in a room with high ceilings and moderate sunlight, and water occasionally. Its red-trimmed leaves will deliver a dose of unexpected color.

How it Helps: This plant will take care of gases released by xylene, trichloroethylene, and formaldehyde, which can be introduced by lacquers, varnishes, and sealers.

Spider Plant: (Chlorophytum comosum)
A good option for beginning gardeners, the spider plant reproduces quickly, growing long, grassy leaves as well as hanging stems, which eventually sprout plantlets—hence its arachnid-inspired name.

How it Helps: Put a spider plant on a pedestal or in a hanging basket close to a sunlit window and you’ll benefit from fewer airborne formaldehyde and benzene molecules.

Source: This Old House